Article Index

Introduction:

Being the youth coordinator in Buganda Heritage Association and the cultural lead in the Buganda North London Core, I have taken special interest and passion in propagating the Mind the Gap/Bridging the Gap initiative in our communities based on a personal journey as a youth at one time in UK. My journey as any young Muganda boy growing up during turbulent times of wars that followed, in school, through a network of family, communities I feel
I was partly formed. Living in UK, being a member of the Faith group ,working in NHS and offering charitable time in our communities to promote and educate on Mental Health and recently picking interest in working with our youth having identified a gap or opportunity to engage and learn the language of the youth to understand them and facilitate them to gain confidence to have dialogues with adults and likewise the adults. A heir (omusika) at a tender age have further deepened my passion to be involved in this initiative, ‘Mind The Gap’ & building “The Therapeutic Community Networks”.

This is not new but the difference is about putting Reason and a reflective and critical mind on how, what and why we need to engage more and better.

There are a lot of untapped resources amongst our midst, God given well packaged and sustained by those before us in a way sometimes makes one wonder whether they knew God more than we did considering the depth, width of the knowledge imbedded in our language and norms and behaviours that make us kii kyetuli.

But this knowledge, awareness and sense of being has shrunk and hence reason for the GAP’s.

Over the past 2 years I have been proactively taking on a protracted approach in negotiating, exploring with individual parents, faith leaders and organisations as well as cultural leaders in their differing capacities.
Part of this journey has been through active hands on work when supporting families (in our communities) around the area of mental health challenges.

Partly I have been responding to the Nabagereka call of OBUNTU-BULAMU.
A journey that has brought wealth of ideas that I feel should not stop at me but be a spring board to inspire others and to continue to learn from others to build the idea for the benefit and continuity of our children’s growth in identity and be grounded in a community they have a lot in common.
This is not a finished framework but a progressive one open to review to accommodate new challenges.

I am keen to being offered space and be asked all questions about the underlying philosophical make up of this idea/ Initiative.